Talk of the Nation

1590 posts
  • Vegetables Respond to a Daily Clock, Even After Harvest MP3

    Vegetables plucked from grocery store shelves can be made to respond to patterns of light and darkness, according to a report in the journal Current Biology. Janet Braam and colleagues found that cabbages change their levels of phytonutrients throughout a daily cycle.» E-Mail This     » Add to Del.icio.us

    21.06.2013

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    21.06.2013

  • Coffee's Natural Creamer MP3

    Coffee beans are filled with oils that emerge from coffee grounds under high pressure. These oils form the crema�"the frothy stuff on top of an espresso. In the last installment of Science Friday's series on coffee, food-science writer Harold McGee, author of On Food and Cooking, explains the chemistry of crema.» E-Mail This     » Add to Del.icio.us

    21.06.2013

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    21.06.2013

  • 'Blood & Beauty' Breathes New Life Into The Borgias MP3

    In the 1500s, Italy was bursting with some of the most influential and vivid figures in history. In her latest book, Blood & Beauty: The Borgias, novelist Sarah Dunant explores the story of the powerful and notorious family.» E-Mail This     » Add to Del.icio.us

    20.06.2013

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    20.06.2013

  • The Business And Politics Of Air Quality Regulation MP3

    In a speech in Germany Wednesday, President Barack Obama said it's time to take "bold action" on climate change. Many believe that major changes to policies on carbon emissions lie ahead, which would mean a host of new regulations for businesses.» E-Mail This     » Add to Del.icio.us

    20.06.2013

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    20.06.2013

  • After A Surge Of Violence, The Threat Of A New Civil War In Iraq MP3

    Since the beginning of April, more than 2,000 people have died in bombings and other attacks in Iraq. NPR foreign correspondent Kelly McEvers, just back from a trip to Baghdad, explains what's behind the recent rise in violence and what's changed since U.S. troops left the country in 2011.» E-Mail This     » Add to Del.icio.us

    20.06.2013

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    20.06.2013

  • Nikky Finney Ponders Possibilities Of The Poetry Profession MP3

    Nikky Finney won the National Book Award for her poetry collection Head Off & Split in 2011. Two years later, she is on the other side as a judge and the chair of the award panel. As part of TOTN's "Looking Ahead" series, Finney discusses the future of poetry as a profession.» E-Mail This     » Add to Del.icio.us

    20.06.2013

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    20.06.2013

  • Deadpan Humor And Childhood Fears Collide In 'The Dark' MP3

    Are you afraid of the dark? In his latest children's book, The Dark, Daniel Handler — who writes under the pen name Lemony Snicket — takes on darkness itself, with the story of a young boy who confronts his biggest fear.» E-Mail This     » Add to Del.icio.us

    19.06.2013

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    19.06.2013

  • Will Work For Free? The Future Of The Unpaid Internship MP3

    A New York Federal District Court judge ruled that Fox Searchlight Pictures broke the law by not paying two interns for work on the film Black Swan. As a result, private employers may be considering revising their internship programs, or scrapping them altogether.» E-Mail This     » Add to Del.icio.us

    19.06.2013

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    19.06.2013

  • Letters: Researching Rare Diseases, Only Children MP3

    NPR's Neal Conan reads from listener comments on previous show topics, including research into rare diseases and the joys and myths of having an only child.» E-Mail This     » Add to Del.icio.us

    19.06.2013

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    19.06.2013

  • The Penultimate Edition Of The Political Junkie MP3

    Ken Rudin recaps the week in politics. Boston Globe political reporter Jim O'Sullivan previews the special election between Mass. Senate candidates Edward Markey and Gabriel Gomez on June 25. NPR senior Washington editor Ron Elving looks to the future of Congress.» E-Mail This     » Add to Del.icio.us

    19.06.2013

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    19.06.2013

  • Breaking Bad News To Kids: How Media Has Tweaked The Process MP3

    Parents have always had to break hard news to kids, from family hardships to national tragedies. Now there are more ways for children to learn about news faster — through 24 hour news and social media. So, what's changed in how parents broach these subjects? How can media help, or hurt?» E-Mail This     » Add to Del.icio.us

    18.06.2013

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    18.06.2013

  • Obama's Former Legal Adviser Urges U.S. To 'Disciple Drones' MP3

    Harold Koh, who was a legal architect for President Barack Obama's drone policies, criticized the administration's lack of transparency on its use of drones. In a speech at Oxford University, the former legal adviser for the State Department suggested the U.S. "discipline drones."» E-Mail This     » Add to Del.icio.us

    18.06.2013

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    18.06.2013

  • A Look Ahead To The Future Of Afghanistan MP3

    Twelve years after the war began, Afghanistan's president announced Tuesday that Afghan forces officially assumed control of security for the country. U.S. and NATO troops will remain until the 2014 deadline, but the Afghan military is now expected to fight without NATO support.» E-Mail This     » Add to Del.icio.us

    18.06.2013

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    18.06.2013

  • When A Language Dies, What Happens To Culture? MP3

    Nearly half of the 7,000 languages spoken in the world are expected to vanish in the next 100 years. One of them is Athabaskan, a language of the Siletz tribe in the Pacific Northwest. Bud Lane, vice chairman of Siletz tribal council, explains the importance of language diversity.» E-Mail This     » Add to Del.icio.us

    18.06.2013

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    18.06.2013

  • 'Cows' To The Rescue! Soil's Secrets For Saving The Earth MP3

    In her book Cows Save the Planet, journalist Judith Schwartz argues that soil is the key to addressing carbon issues and climate change. It's not only where food is created and where waste decays, but it could also hold the key to solving a long list of environmental problems.» E-Mail This     » Add to Del.icio.us

    17.06.2013

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    17.06.2013

  • Reflections On 30 Years Of NYC: A Look Ahead With Margot Adler MP3

    From the AIDS movement to the Sept. 11 attacks to Occupy Wall Street, NPR's Margot Adler has covered important issues facing New York City for more than three decades. As part of TOTN's "Looking Ahead" series, Adler reflects on her years in the business and the future of New York City.» E-Mail This     » Add to Del.icio.us

    17.06.2013

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    17.06.2013

  • After SCOTUS DNA Ruling, What Changes For Police? MP3

    The Supreme Court ruled in June that police can routinely take DNA samples from people who are arrested for comparison against a national database. The decision raises major questions about how law enforcement and criminal justice processes will change.» E-Mail This     » Add to Del.icio.us

    17.06.2013

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    17.06.2013

  • Is Big Change Ahead In Iran? A Biography Of The President Elect MP3

    Iranians elected Hasan Rowhani, a reformist-backed cleric, as president — a surprise to many who expected an ultraconservative candidate to win. Former NPR foreign correspondent Mike Shuster provides analysis and responds to opinion pieces about what has changed after the election.» E-Mail This     » Add to Del.icio.us

    17.06.2013

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    17.06.2013

  • Denis Hayes on Being Green MP3

    Since his days as head of the Solar Energy Research Institute under President Jimmy Carter, Denis Hayes has been pushing to add more renewable energy sources to the country's energy portfolio. Hayes discusses the current U.S. market for renewables such as solar and wind, and gives his take on where he sees America's energy future headed.» E-Mail This     » Add to Del.icio.us

    14.06.2013

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    14.06.2013

  • With Climate Change, No Happy Clams MP3

    Carbon emissions are slowly acidifying ocean waters, forcing marine life to adapt. Oysters and other shellfish, for example, may have a harder time building their shells, according to NOAA's Richard Feely. At Quilcene, Washington's Taylor Shellfish Hatchery, research director Benoit Eudeline says he's already seeing those effects.» E-Mail This     » Add to Del.icio.us

    14.06.2013

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    14.06.2013

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