MP3: When A Language Dies, What Happens To Culture?

18.06.2013

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When A Language Dies, What Happens To Culture? MP3

Nearly half of the 7,000 languages spoken in the world are expected to vanish in the next 100 years. One of them is Athabaskan, a language of the Siletz tribe in the Pacific Northwest. Bud Lane, vice chairman of Siletz tribal council, explains the importance of language diversity.» E-Mail This     » Add to Del.icio.us Source: npr.org

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