MP3: Shorts: The Man Behind the Maneuver

05.03.2013

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Shorts: The Man Behind the Maneuver MP3

In the 1970s, choking became national news: thousands were choking to death, leading to more accidental deaths than guns. Nobody knew what to do. Until a man named Henry Heimlich came along with a big idea. Source: radiolab.org

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